Andrés Pachon_In memorian_13/07/12_31/07/12

This exhibition will be presented under the title of the photographic series In Memoriam (2011), which is shown for the first time. Next to the photo project, we found the video of the project Shadows of New Guinea (2011). These works arise from modification of related photographic and videographic, both themselves and others. It tries to reveal how our experience of reality is mediated by the imaginary, and as this builds our eyes, in this case, with respect to the other cultural and media face. In Memoriam series consists of seven composite photographs by several layers, layers that make up an idea in a lathe to face media, its representation, and its durability. Television busts, heads of State and representatives belonging to the times of the technical reproduction, presented to us by Museum sculptures of playfulness, a representation more in the imagology that configures these faces. His gestures appear fragmented and eroded, reminding us of the ruins of classical sculpture. Sculptures seeking away from these portraits, the dignity of the portrayed.

In Memoriam series consists of seven composite photographs by several layers, layers that make up an idea in a lathe to face media, its representation, and its durability. Television busts, heads of State and representatives belonging to the times of the technical reproduction, presented to us by Museum sculptures of playfulness, a representation more in the imagology that configures these faces. His gestures appear fragmented and eroded, reminding us of the ruins of classical sculpture. Sculptures seeking away from these portraits, the dignity of the portrayed.

All it displayed by document-photograph that they speculate about the "future" tatters of the media gesture. An attempt to take away (temporary) to a gesture built, learned and iconographic that to be the focus of attention has been deformed, worn and, in some cases, outdated and unrecognizable. We could say that these faces are bodies of their own time, because, in reality, they were always his own image, never in the flesh. With these artificial ruins, there is a cycle of life and death, only a final time without any beginning. The Shadows of New Guinea video begins with the appropriation of the ethnographic documentary Dead Birds (1964), directed by the visual anthropologist and documentary filmmaker Robert Gardner. This film studies the people of Dani, Nueva Guinea, at that time one of the only areas remaining in the world to be colonized. Dead Birds was heavily criticised by the anthropological community due to their lack of authenticity: post-synchronized the sound and recreated scenes of battle with still photos. What shadows of New Guinea poses is a further step in this lack of authenticity. From small pieces of the film, as if it were scraps or leftovers from the original, is a rotoscoping (redraw manual frame by frame) by which shadows are generated to the protagonists of the documentary. Nature where they develop actions, the original context of the highlands of New Guinea whose reference was caught on camera, becomes a huge artificial background, a trompe-l'oeil unveiled by the shadows. These shadows, and its consequent effect play in the set of images, to reveal the fantasy contained in the Western imagination of a tribal and exotic world. Reveal us a finite Fund, a wall that at first did not exist, or that thought. A wall that separates us from the other; and it is that it is about those who are on the other side of the wall on which they fantasize, in which we project our anxieties, fears, and desires, as well as the shadows, are projected on the wall that they themselves have created.

The Shadows of New Guinea video begins with the appropriation of the ethnographic documentary Dead Birds (1964), directed by the visual anthropologist and documentary filmmaker Robert Gardner. This film studies the people of Dani, Nueva Guinea, at that time one of the only areas remaining in the world to be colonized. Dead Birds was heavily criticised from the anthropological community due to their lack of authenticity: post-synchronized the sound and recreated scenes of battle with still photos. What shadows of New Guinea poses is a further step in this lack of authenticity. From small pieces of the film, as if it were scraps or leftovers from the original, is a rotoscoping (redraw manual frame aframe) by which shadows are generated to the protagonists of the documentary. The nature where they develop actions, the original context of the high land of New Guinea whose reference was caught on camera, becomes a huge artificial background, a trompe-l'oeil unveiled by the shadows. These shadows, and its consequent effect play in the set of images, to reveal the fantasy contained in the Western imagination of a tribal and exotic world. Reveal us a finite Fund, a wall that at first did not exist, or that thought. A wall that separates us from the other; and it is that it is about those who are on the other side of the wall on which they fantasize, in which we project our anxieties, fears and desires, as well as the shadows are projected on the wall that they themselves have created.

The Shadows of New Guinea video begins with the appropriation of the ethnographic documentary Dead Birds (1964), directed by the visual anthropologist and documentary filmmaker Robert Gardner. This film studies the people of Dani, Nueva Guinea, at that time one of the only areas remaining in the world to be colonized. Dead Birds was heavily criticised from the anthropological community due to their lack of authenticity: post-synchronized the sound and recreated scenes of battle with still photos. What shadows of New Guinea poses is a further step in this lack of authenticity. From small pieces of the film, as if it were scraps or leftovers from the original, is a rotoscoping (redraw manual frame aframe) by which shadows are generated to the protagonists of the documentary. The nature where they develop actions, the original context of the high land of New Guinea whose reference was caught on camera, becomes a huge artificial background, a trompe-l'oeil unveiled by the shadows. These shadows, and its consequent effect play in the set of images, to reveal the fantasy contained in the Western imagination of a tribal and exotic world. Reveal us a finite Fund, a wall that at first did not exist, or that thought. A wall that separates us from the other; and it is that it is about those who are on the other side of the wall on which they fantasize, in which we project our anxieties, fears and desires, as well as the shadows are projected on the wall that they themselves have created.

These shadows, and its consequent effect play in the set of images, to reveal the fantasy contained in the Western imagination of a tribal and exotic world. Reveal us a finite Fund, a wall that at first did not exist, or that thought. A wall that separates us from the other; and it is that it is about those who are on the other side of the wall on which they fantasize, in which we project our anxieties, fears and desires, as well as the shadows are projected on the wall that they themselves have created.